Classical Movie

Drama Movie

PG
★★☆☆☆

Mokshya

Drama

MOKSHYA - SYNOPSIS Mokshya is the story of Kosish. The year is 2003. Kosish is eighteen and is a dreamer. With his band MOKSHYA, he aspires become a successful musician. He daydreams that one day his efforts will pay off and Mokshya will perform in front of a large crowd of roaring fans. But to Kosish's conservative dad, Kosish's dreams are of little worth. When his band makes it to the finals of a band competition, Kosish sees this as an escape route that will secure his hopes. Although, Kosish's musical journey is heading in the right direction, his studies and love life go a downhill ride in the course of time. Hindered with uncertainties of life Kosish feels defeated but at the finals, his talents shine as Mokshya amazes everyone with its performance. And finally they win the competition. As the winners, they earn a record deal and are all set to sign up for a ALL NEPAL TOUR. Then the unexpected happens. While the band celebrates its triumph, Kosish falls victim to a group attack. Kosish gets severely injured. At the hospital we are informed that Kosish suffers from spinal cord injury that will make him a paraplegic (inability to move lower body) throughout his life. This comes as a nightmare to Kosish's friends and family. With the doctor's suggestion Kosish is made oblivious about his condition until he has psychologically matured. As time passes, Kosish friends and specially his girlfriend Smriti, help him recover. But the problems don't seem to finish yet. Due to Kosish's condition the Music Company cancels Mokshya's record deal causing internal clashes between members. Moreover, Kosish is made aware that he wouldn't be able to walk again at the time when the band splits. Kosish takes the news quite hard. He abandons his friends and breaks up with his girlfriend. The dreams that he sowed do not germinate into crops of reality. Now, it has been six years since Moskhya split, Kosish now works in his father's convenience store doing a mundane job. Unfortunately, it seems that he has given up his dreams on becoming a musician. Will he be able to rise back again and give music another chance? Will he learn to accept himself?

Show Details

Show Details

Comedy Movie

Love Story Movie

Romance Movie

Action Movie

Short Films Movie

Kids Movie

Animations Movie

Crime Movie

Thriller Movie

Others Movie

Suspense Movie

Documentary Movie

PF
★★★★☆

Debtocracy

Documentary, Greek, International

Debtocracy is a 2011 left-wing documentary film by Katerina Kitidi and Aris Chatzistefanou. The documentary examines the causes of the Greek debt crisis in 2010 and advocates for the default of "odious debt". The documentary opens with the statements of Greek Prime Ministers, starting with the dictator Georgios Papadopoulos and Dominique Strauss-Kahn, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, and ending with some of the most prominent figures in Greek politics since the metapolitefsi: Andreas Papandreou, Konstantinos Mitsotakis, Kostas Simitis, Kostas Karamanlis and the then Prime Minister George Papandreou. The focus then shifts to the prelude to the recent global economic crisis and its origins in the 1970s. Interviews with prominent[citation needed] figures of the global philosophical and economic scene argue that the euro is non-viable and contributed to the worsening of the finances of Greece due to a systematic loss of competitiveness in the markets by the PIGS. The documentary traces the roots of the Greek debt back to the revolution of 1821 and the British loans that were issued. The documentary criticises the notion that the Greek population, since it enjoyed the country's prosperity produced by past loans, is now accountable as a whole for the debts. Debtocracy argues Greek politicians encouraged too much borrowing and corruption. The documentary praises Ecuador's decision to unilaterally default on part of its sovereign debt, on grounds of social justice. The solution suggested for the Greek crisis is the formation of a committee for the analysis of the debt in a similar way that Ecuador did. If the analysis proves all or part of the debt to be odious the people should not have to pay for it and therefore it should be erased, the film argues. The production team of Debtocracy have said that the producers are all those individuals that donated money in order to finance the project.[5] Interviewees include: David Harvey, geographer and social theorist Hugo Arias, president of the debt analysis committee of Ecuador Samir Amin, economist Eric Toussaint, political scientist and spokesperson of the Committee for the Abolition of Illegitimate Debt Gérard Duménil Costas Lapavitsas, economist Alain Badiou, philosopher Manolis Glezos, member of the Greek Resistance and left-wing politician Avi Lewis, journalist and film director Sahra Wagenknecht

Show Details

Show Details

Greek Movie

PF
★★★★☆

Debtocracy

Documentary, Greek, International

Debtocracy is a 2011 left-wing documentary film by Katerina Kitidi and Aris Chatzistefanou. The documentary examines the causes of the Greek debt crisis in 2010 and advocates for the default of "odious debt". The documentary opens with the statements of Greek Prime Ministers, starting with the dictator Georgios Papadopoulos and Dominique Strauss-Kahn, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, and ending with some of the most prominent figures in Greek politics since the metapolitefsi: Andreas Papandreou, Konstantinos Mitsotakis, Kostas Simitis, Kostas Karamanlis and the then Prime Minister George Papandreou. The focus then shifts to the prelude to the recent global economic crisis and its origins in the 1970s. Interviews with prominent[citation needed] figures of the global philosophical and economic scene argue that the euro is non-viable and contributed to the worsening of the finances of Greece due to a systematic loss of competitiveness in the markets by the PIGS. The documentary traces the roots of the Greek debt back to the revolution of 1821 and the British loans that were issued. The documentary criticises the notion that the Greek population, since it enjoyed the country's prosperity produced by past loans, is now accountable as a whole for the debts. Debtocracy argues Greek politicians encouraged too much borrowing and corruption. The documentary praises Ecuador's decision to unilaterally default on part of its sovereign debt, on grounds of social justice. The solution suggested for the Greek crisis is the formation of a committee for the analysis of the debt in a similar way that Ecuador did. If the analysis proves all or part of the debt to be odious the people should not have to pay for it and therefore it should be erased, the film argues. The production team of Debtocracy have said that the producers are all those individuals that donated money in order to finance the project.[5] Interviewees include: David Harvey, geographer and social theorist Hugo Arias, president of the debt analysis committee of Ecuador Samir Amin, economist Eric Toussaint, political scientist and spokesperson of the Committee for the Abolition of Illegitimate Debt Gérard Duménil Costas Lapavitsas, economist Alain Badiou, philosopher Manolis Glezos, member of the Greek Resistance and left-wing politician Avi Lewis, journalist and film director Sahra Wagenknecht

Show Details

Show Details

International Movie

PF
★★★★☆

Debtocracy

Documentary, Greek, International

Debtocracy is a 2011 left-wing documentary film by Katerina Kitidi and Aris Chatzistefanou. The documentary examines the causes of the Greek debt crisis in 2010 and advocates for the default of "odious debt". The documentary opens with the statements of Greek Prime Ministers, starting with the dictator Georgios Papadopoulos and Dominique Strauss-Kahn, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, and ending with some of the most prominent figures in Greek politics since the metapolitefsi: Andreas Papandreou, Konstantinos Mitsotakis, Kostas Simitis, Kostas Karamanlis and the then Prime Minister George Papandreou. The focus then shifts to the prelude to the recent global economic crisis and its origins in the 1970s. Interviews with prominent[citation needed] figures of the global philosophical and economic scene argue that the euro is non-viable and contributed to the worsening of the finances of Greece due to a systematic loss of competitiveness in the markets by the PIGS. The documentary traces the roots of the Greek debt back to the revolution of 1821 and the British loans that were issued. The documentary criticises the notion that the Greek population, since it enjoyed the country's prosperity produced by past loans, is now accountable as a whole for the debts. Debtocracy argues Greek politicians encouraged too much borrowing and corruption. The documentary praises Ecuador's decision to unilaterally default on part of its sovereign debt, on grounds of social justice. The solution suggested for the Greek crisis is the formation of a committee for the analysis of the debt in a similar way that Ecuador did. If the analysis proves all or part of the debt to be odious the people should not have to pay for it and therefore it should be erased, the film argues. The production team of Debtocracy have said that the producers are all those individuals that donated money in order to finance the project.[5] Interviewees include: David Harvey, geographer and social theorist Hugo Arias, president of the debt analysis committee of Ecuador Samir Amin, economist Eric Toussaint, political scientist and spokesperson of the Committee for the Abolition of Illegitimate Debt Gérard Duménil Costas Lapavitsas, economist Alain Badiou, philosopher Manolis Glezos, member of the Greek Resistance and left-wing politician Avi Lewis, journalist and film director Sahra Wagenknecht

Show Details

Show Details

Action. Romance Movie

Horror Movie

Social Movie

Social Drama Movie

Women Empowerment Movie